✚9471✚ German post WW2 1957 pattern Glider Pilot's Badge miniature Segelflugzeug

£36.99

Original German Luftwaffe post WW2 / 1957 pattern Glider Pilot's Badge miniature stickpin, IN VERY GOOD CONDITION, A REALLY GOOD PIECE, THE MINIATURE IS VERY RARELY SEEN, SIZE: cca 10 mm

FEW FACTS ABOUT 1957 PATTERN AWARDS:

In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War II–era decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses , Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück - often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany's official decorations including Germany's highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government.

HISTORY OF THE AWARD:

German Glider Pilot's Badge (Segelflugzeugführerabzeichen) - One of the most rare of the Luftwaffe badges, the glider pilot badge was instituted on December 16, 1940. It was awarded to pilots who successfully completed the glider training course. The badge was compromised of a silvered oak leaves wreath with a swastika at the base. The upper and the lower branches of the swastika may be cut out or solid.  A dark oxidized eagle is riveted to the wreath by two tiny round rivet, the eagles' wings are widely spanned with its legs bent close to the body. The claws are generally well detailed and hand finished, and the ridges are burnished. The fastening system depends on the manufacturer, though it is typically a round barrel hinge soldered to the wreath as with all Luftwaffe badges. On lower quality Glider Pilot badges there is a hinge and hook attached with soldering plates. The round needle pin and the hook are also soldered to the wreath. The badge was manufactured in aluminum, nickel-silver alliage, tombak, or zinc. It seems that a precocious manufacture existed, who built the badge with the same design but with a larger eagle. The badge was also available in a cloth version. The badge was presented in a dark blue box whose bottom lid was composed of a blue velvet or blue flocage. The top lid was composed of violet blue silk or blue paper, with the name of the award stenciled in silver on the out part of the top lid. A certificate was presented to the pilot and the rewarding of the badge was entered in the Soldbuch. The award was worn on the uniform upper left pocket. Only a few pictures exist showing its wear, one of which may be seen to the right. The badge was presented to all Glider Pilots who completed the required training course and became certified. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War II–era decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region).